Apr 122021
 

1) the preferred share price to offer for equity financing; 2) the preferred share price that must be offered with a discount for equity financing; 3. the price per share determined by a pre-negotiated valuation ceiling (see below); or four. Option 2 or Option 3 below. The exact conditions of a SAFE vary. However, the basic mechanics[1] are that the investor makes available to the company a certain amount of financing at the time of signing. In return, the investor will later receive shares in the company in connection with specific contractual liquidity events. The main trigger is usually the sale of preferred shares by the company, usually as part of a future fundraising cycle. Unlike direct equity acquisition, shares are not valued at the time of SAFE signing. Instead, investors and the company negotiate the mechanism with which future shares will be issued and defer actual valuation. These conditions generally include an entity valuation cap and/or a discount on the valuation of the shares at the time of triggering. In this way, the SAFE investor participates above the company between the signing of safe (and the financing provided) and the triggering event. A safe is simple and short. It saves you the trouble of negotiating and agreeing on the amount of equity financing, which is often quite difficult to reconcile between the investor and the business at an early stage of the business.

Our first safe was a “pre-money” safe, because at the time of its launch, startups collected smaller sums of money before collecting a funding cycle (typically a Preferred Stock Round Series). The safe was a quick and simple way to get the first money into the business, and the concept was that safe owners were only early investors in this future price cycle. But fundraising, staged early on, grew in the years following the introduction of the initial safe, and now startups are raising far more money than the first “seeds” funding cycle. While safes are used for these seed rounds, these towers are really better regarded as totally separate financing, instead of turning “bridges” into subsequent price cycles. a convertible bond is a maturity date at which, if the conversion does not take place, the entity returns the amount of the investment to the investor, but not a SAFE; a convertible loan with interest, but not a SAFE; and a convertible bond gives the minimum amount of the average to be obtained for the financing of equity, but not a SAFE.

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